Be You, But Better: Common Courtesy; Is it still common?

Back to Article
Back to Article

Be You, But Better: Common Courtesy; Is it still common?

Alaina Africano, Staff Writer

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






Positivity is something that many of us struggle to find in this day and age. We get caught up in school and all the other activities or commitments that pile up on our plates. Kindness and courtesy fall into the “positivity” category, as well, and people of all ages struggle to see those as well. Common courtesy tends to be set to the side, even though these small actions are taught to us from a very young age.  It may seem like a hopeless cause but I have spent the last few weeks observing our hallways and classrooms, searching for the common courtesy that we all desire and, lo and behold, I found what I was looking for.

On my quest to re-discover common courtesy, I began to pay close attention to multiple things, especially during passing periods. As we all push past each other to get through the halls and to our next class, I paid specific attention to the doors. Throughout the day, several young men and women took the time to hold the door open while we hustled past. This simple act is beneficial to at least 30 students, if not more. Although it may seem simple, this small act allows our transition from class to class to happen much more quickly and smoothly.

As I continued my observations, I turned my attention to the hallways. However, I looked at the hallways not when they were busy, but instead, when they were mostly empty. During this time you are much more likely to have one on one contact with other students or staff. Even though the hallways are vast, you are bound to run into someone while you are roaming the halls.  During my time in the halls, the students or staff that made eye-contact with me when we walked by each other are the ones that continue to stick out in my mind. In fact, according to a study conducted at Cornell University, eye-contact sparks a subconscious connection with the other person. Having just arrived here at Coronado in January, these students and staff that I have had eye-contact with have helped me keep a positive attitude on tough days, even if they didn’t know.

In the process of writing this article, administration handed out slips of paper asking us to write about one positive or courteous student we have encountered at school. Many students struggled with this task but many others were able to write about positive actions they have seen around campus. Even though the majority of these slips mentioned small things, like sharing food, holding the door, or just having a positive attitude, these are all steps in the right direction. These small things will add up and  stir up an air of optimism.

As with anything, encouraging courtesy and positivity will take time. However, that encouragement starts with us. Students have the biggest influence on campus and if the student body encourages courtesy, change will begin to happen. As the idea of courtesy grows, so will the attitude of the students and staff around you. Picking up trash, holding the door, or even a simple smile will spark the change we all wish to see and help you be you, but better.

Print Friendly, PDF & Email